Pinned toot

"Men are always alright. Right up until they pull the trigger. And then we watch the neighbors solemnly march out to the news cameras to tell us: 'He was such a nice, quiet guy.'"

-- Evelyn Marsh, Twin Peaks S02E11 (1990)

Pinned toot
Pinned toot

What if you could switch off the combat in ODST and just watch the aliens roam about the city

Markus boosted
Markus boosted
Markus boosted
Markus boosted
Markus boosted

Hit or miss
I drank the gamer piss, huh
I went to furred con and now I'm really sick huh

Finally, the toot from the future has been pushed off the top of my feed

Markus boosted
Markus boosted
Markus boosted
Markus boosted
Markus boosted

Oh, the joys of job searching in late stage capitalism

Markus boosted

@lynnesbian any idea when you'll get around to fixing the post timestamps from your blog? They get stuck at the top of my feed for hours since being from the future means they're more recent that anything from the present

Markus boosted

Would you like a tree in this trying time? It has 404 nodes, descending 71 nodes down.

Markus boosted

There are many different system files that Windows needs in order to function. These files are often updated using Windows Update to add new features, fix bugs, patch security issues, and more.

Windows is unable to replace these files while they’re in use. This is for numerous reasons, both technical and practical.

If an update specifies that file X needs to be replaced, and file X is being used by a critical system process, then we have an issue. Closing the critical process would cause Windows to stop working, which is obviously unacceptable behaviour. There’s no way to switch the old version of file X with the new one while the critical process is running, but Windows needs that process.

The only way to safely stop the critical process is to restart Windows. Updated can either be applied before or after you restart. Windows will ensure that the critical process isn’t running yet, replace file X, and then start up normally. Windows can’t start up properly until the new version of file X is in place, so you can’t use Windows while it’s updating.

Not all updates require a restart. Windows Vista introduced a feature that allows system files to be replaced while the system is running under certain conditions. If an update replaces a non-critical file, or a file your computer isn’t using, it’s not necessary to restart.

Unix-based systems like macOS and Linux don’t need to reboot as often, due to the way they handle loading files. In short, Unix systems load critical files in memory and don’t depend on the version on the hard drive, while Windows depends on the files on the hard drive staying the same. If a critical file on Linux needs to be updated, the system will simply swap the old version with the new one while running. Currently running processes will use the old version, but new processes will use the new file. Replacing certain files still requires rebooting. This does, however, pose a security risk, and rebooting to ensure the new files are loaded is still recommended, even if it’s not technically required.

#lynne-teaches-tech

https://bune.city/2019/05/lynne-teaches-tech-windows-restarts/

Markus boosted

It depends!

Right now, there are two common types of consumer-oriented display technologies: LCD, and OLED (including AMOLED). LCD screens won’t save any battery life by using dark themes, while OLED ones do.

LCD

Consumer electronics with LCD displays use LED backlights to give the image brightness. You may sometimes see LCD displays referred to as “LED-LCD”, or (mistakenly) “LED”. The LED provides the backlight, while the LCD displays the picture. It’s possible to have an LCD display without a backlight (the Gameboy and Gameboy Colour had one), but uncommon.

The LED backlight provides brightness to the whole LCD display at once. To light up even one pixel, the whole display needs to be lit up. There’s no way to have only some areas bright and others dark, it’s all or nothing. Issues like backlight bleeding are inherent to this approach, and “true black” can never be displayed, as the display is always emitting light.

An example of backlight bleeding (light “leaking” from the edges of the screen)Image source (CC-BY-SA)

Colour is irrelevant to power saving on an LCD display. The only thing that helps is turning down the brightness. Displaying black at full brightness uses much more power than displaying white at low brightness, even though the white screen would provide much more light. The LCD filters out the blacklight to provide black, but the backlight’s still on.

However, LCD displays tend to be more power efficient when displaying bright images than OLED displays. As soon as you start turning down the brightness, though, OLED quickly pulls ahead.

OLED

OLED displays don’t have backlights. Every pixel is individually lit, so making half the screen black would use (about) half the power. Because of this, dark themes really do save power on OLED displays. Darker colours mean less power usage, and i a pixel is completely black (pure black, no light at all), it will turn off. A dark theme with a pure black background saves much, much more power than a dark grey background, because it allows the pixels to turn off entirely.

There’s a downside to this, however – the pixels can’t be turned on instantly. If you’re scrolling quickly down a page with a pure black background on an OLED device, you might notice subtle “smears” caused by the pixels taking some time to turn on. This effect is hard to notice in most cases, but is still something to consider.

The colour can also affect the battery usage. Google gave a real world example of battery usage with various colours on their 2016 Pixel phone:

Blue uses much more power than red or green, and white uses the most.Summary

Dark themes don’t make a difference to power consumption on an LCD display, although you may find them easier on the eyes. While LCD displays light up the entire display at once with a backlight, OLED displays can set the brightness individually for each pixel, meaning that mostly black images use less power.

#lynne-teaches-tech

https://bune.city/2019/05/lynne-teaches-tech-dark-mode/

Markus boosted
Markus boosted

Would you like a tree in this trying time? It has 161 nodes, descending 29 nodes down.

Markus boosted
Show more
Chitter

Welcome! Chitter is a social network fostering a friendly, inclusive, and incredibly soft community. All sorts of folk with all sorts of interests gather here. At any time, the local timeline might be talking about video games, tech, art, furry stuff, LGBTQIA and identity, jokes (lots of jokes,) etc…